End of London People II

From the London People II collection

(The Intro below is from London People I)

In the mid 1960s I had an assignment from Holiday Magazine to shoot people of Paris. It worked out fine. I got eight pages, and that was that.

So I got the idea to do it in London. One of the reasons was that I was impressed with the many faces that obviously were not English: Moroccan, Nigerian, Asian, etc. But as I got into the assignment I realized that most of my images were of the English.

To me, they were exotic as anyone else. I find the English wonderfully eccentric, colorful, individualistic, and wholly without subterfuge. They are what they are. They’ve been this way forever and they wouldn’t think of changing. It also helped that I almost speak the language.

Some time ago I tried to classify people’s reaction to being photographed.

For instance, the Italians pose, they are proud, they know they’re beautiful. The Japanese want to take your picture. The Germans want to know if you have permission, etc, etc.

I always thought of the English reaction: they look behind their back to see who you’re really photographing.

They’re not self-conscious nor did they show off, pose, mug for the camera or otherwise dilute what I was trying to do. It was a gas.

End of London People II

England, 1965
Kodachrome

$2,400.00

Pay by credit card, check, or over the phone

From the London People II collection

(The Intro below is from London People I)

In the mid 1960s I had an assignment from Holiday Magazine to shoot people of Paris. It worked out fine. I got eight pages, and that was that.

So I got the idea to do it in London. One of the reasons was that I was impressed with the many faces that obviously were not English: Moroccan, Nigerian, Asian, etc. But as I got into the assignment I realized that most of my images were of the English.

To me, they were exotic as anyone else. I find the English wonderfully eccentric, colorful, individualistic, and wholly without subterfuge. They are what they are. They’ve been this way forever and they wouldn’t think of changing. It also helped that I almost speak the language.

Some time ago I tried to classify people’s reaction to being photographed.

For instance, the Italians pose, they are proud, they know they’re beautiful. The Japanese want to take your picture. The Germans want to know if you have permission, etc, etc.

I always thought of the English reaction: they look behind their back to see who you’re really photographing.

They’re not self-conscious nor did they show off, pose, mug for the camera or otherwise dilute what I was trying to do. It was a gas.

Paper & Printing

Epson Legacy Baryta 

Baryta paper has a white, smooth satin finish with the look and feel of the revered silver halide F-surface darkroom papers and provides excellent image permanence.

13x19 prints are placed on backing board inside a clear plastic bag. They are then packaged in a custom 15x21x3 corrugated box protected inside 3 inches of charcoal foam. More about shipping...

20x30 prints are shipped flat in MasterPak PrintPak Art Shipping Sleeves. A "container within a container" with multiple layers of protection.

40x60 Paper prints will rolled and shipped in a archival tubeMore about shipping...

Dye-Sublimation onto Aluminum (Metal)

Transferring the print to aluminum produces a vivid, archival quality print that is scratch resistant, doesn’t require glass or framing, and is lightweight and easy to hang. More about the paper...

Metal prints are shipped in a sturdy 44x63x3 wooden crate. More about shipping...