Military Family

From the Romania II collection

(The Intro Below is from Romania I):

I’ve been to Romania once. I was asked, with other photographers, to accompany an exhibition of photography in America, and represent the United States as part of a cultural exchange program with the former USSR.

Before leaving for Romania, I was visited by the FBI to prep me for my trip. I took everything they said with a grain of salt. It was all obviously anti-communist propaganda. They warned me about espionage and blackmail, surveillance, and the terrible things that would go on. 

I thought to myself, This is Romania, not Moscow. It’s more liberal. They’re just hysterical and paranoid.

Sadly, I was way wrong. Ceausescu was in power at the time, and he was a total despot. He was executed 15 years later in the Romanian Revolution.

Our hotel phones were bugged, our rooms were searched and people were arrested for communicating with us. 

It was literally unlawful for Romanians to socialize with foreigners. They did though, and at great risk to themselves. I fell in love with them as a people. Even those I met in the most superficial way.

Despite the military presence everyone we met was warm, friendly and went out of their way to be of assistance to us.

In the countryside, I came across a wedding and was asked to join in and take pictures. 

In Cluj, a small city, we saw a sign that said,(in Romanian) “Welcome to our anniversary, 474 - 1974.” They’ve been around for a while.

They are a homogenous people, darkly handsome, open, warm, curious, amiable, but a bit cautious. They were wary of us as we were of them. 

It puts the lie to the thinking that defines“them” and“ us” as the only possibility.

As always, terrible governments; wonderful people. 

Military Family

Romania
Kodachrome, 1974

$2,400.00

Pay by credit card, check, or over the phone

From the Romania II collection

(The Intro Below is from Romania I):

I’ve been to Romania once. I was asked, with other photographers, to accompany an exhibition of photography in America, and represent the United States as part of a cultural exchange program with the former USSR.

Before leaving for Romania, I was visited by the FBI to prep me for my trip. I took everything they said with a grain of salt. It was all obviously anti-communist propaganda. They warned me about espionage and blackmail, surveillance, and the terrible things that would go on. 

I thought to myself, This is Romania, not Moscow. It’s more liberal. They’re just hysterical and paranoid.

Sadly, I was way wrong. Ceausescu was in power at the time, and he was a total despot. He was executed 15 years later in the Romanian Revolution.

Our hotel phones were bugged, our rooms were searched and people were arrested for communicating with us. 

It was literally unlawful for Romanians to socialize with foreigners. They did though, and at great risk to themselves. I fell in love with them as a people. Even those I met in the most superficial way.

Despite the military presence everyone we met was warm, friendly and went out of their way to be of assistance to us.

In the countryside, I came across a wedding and was asked to join in and take pictures. 

In Cluj, a small city, we saw a sign that said,(in Romanian) “Welcome to our anniversary, 474 - 1974.” They’ve been around for a while.

They are a homogenous people, darkly handsome, open, warm, curious, amiable, but a bit cautious. They were wary of us as we were of them. 

It puts the lie to the thinking that defines“them” and“ us” as the only possibility.

As always, terrible governments; wonderful people. 

Paper & Printing

Epson Legacy Baryta 

Baryta paper has a white, smooth satin finish with the look and feel of the revered silver halide F-surface darkroom papers and provides excellent image permanence.

13x19 prints are placed on backing board inside a clear plastic bag. They are then packaged in a custom 15x21x3 corrugated box protected inside 3 inches of charcoal foam. More about shipping...

20x30 prints are shipped flat in MasterPak PrintPak Art Shipping Sleeves. A "container within a container" with multiple layers of protection.

40x60 Paper prints will rolled and shipped in a archival tubeMore about shipping...

Dye-Sublimation onto Aluminum (Metal)

Transferring the print to aluminum produces a vivid, archival quality print that is scratch resistant, doesn’t require glass or framing, and is lightweight and easy to hang. More about the paper...

Metal prints are shipped in a sturdy 44x63x3 wooden crate. More about shipping...